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Date registered: March 16, 2012

Latest posts

  1. Have a “Tree-mendous” Arbor Day! — January 8, 2017
  2. Nature Tourism – Bald Point State Park — January 8, 2017
  3. Christmas”sea” Cheer! — December 19, 2016
  4. The Christmas “Sea Star” — December 16, 2016
  5. Your Christmas Tree Could Benefit Winter Wildlife — December 16, 2016

Author's posts listings

Don’t Rush Wildlife Plot Planting – Wait for the Rain

A buck chases a doe through plots of wildlife forages being evaluated in 2013 at the University of Florida’s North Florida Research and Education Center. Photo Courtesy of Holly Ober It should be too late in the year for an article about cool season food plots; they should already be up and growing, at the very …

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Permanent link to this article: http://gulf.ifas.ufl.edu/newsletters/2016/11/07/dont-rush-wildlife-plot-planting-wait-for-the-rain/

Sea Turtle Nesting Season Has Officially Ended… and what a season it was

October 31st not only reminds all that the ghost and goblins are out and about, but that the sea turtle nesting season is complete for another year. These federally protected animals typically begin nesting in late April and continue into the month of October – but there is almost always someone late to the party… …

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Permanent link to this article: http://gulf.ifas.ufl.edu/newsletters/2016/11/04/sea-turtle-nesting-season-has-officially-ended-and-what-a-season-it-was/

The Once Mightier Ochlockonee, Dismembered by Sea Level Rise

What do the Ochlockonee and Aucilla rivers have in common? Not much, it would seem, beyond the fact that both have headwaters in Georgia and flow through Florida to the Gulf of Mexico. These two rivers do share the distinction of being unusual, although they’re unusual in very different ways. The Ochlockonee runs yellow-brown between Leon …

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Permanent link to this article: http://gulf.ifas.ufl.edu/newsletters/2016/10/22/the-once-mightier-ochlockonee-dismembered-by-sea-level-rise/

Bats – Helpful, Not Harmful

Brazilian free-tailed bat (Tadarida brasiliensis) eating a corn earworm moth (Helicoverpa zea). If you think you’d prefer a world without bats, we present to you three reasons to reconsider. Most negative stereotypes about bats are untrue. The reality is that bats benefit us in numerous ways. Here are a few facts that may convince you …

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Permanent link to this article: http://gulf.ifas.ufl.edu/newsletters/2016/10/22/bats-helpful-not-harmful/

The Inaugural 2016 FWC Lionfish Challenge has come to an End… So What Now?

Most coastal residents along the panhandle are aware of the invasive lionfish and the potential impacts they could have on local fisheries and ecosystems. Since they were first detected in this area in 2010, there have been tournaments, workshops, and presentations, to help locals both learn about the animal and ways to control them.  Existing …

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Permanent link to this article: http://gulf.ifas.ufl.edu/newsletters/2016/10/14/the-inaugural-2016-fwc-lionfish-challenge-has-come-to-an-end-so-what-now/

Barred Owls- and other features of the “pretty woods”

Beech, magnolia and native river cane (arundinaria) characterize hardwood forests in the Red Hills Photo by Jed Dillard I grew up in the Georgia Piedmont outside Athens, a land of bright red sticky clay, rocks and cold weather. In addition to the ubiquitous Georgia pines, hardwoods including white oaks, hickory and beech grow there. I …

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Permanent link to this article: http://gulf.ifas.ufl.edu/newsletters/2016/10/14/barred-owls-and-other-features-of-the-pretty-woods/

Gardening for Pollinator Conservation Workshop – October 13th, Quincy FL

A “Gardening for Pollinator Conservation” Workshop will take place Thursday, October 13, at the UF/IFAS North Florida Research and Education Center (NFREC) in Quincy. Pollinators are important in conserving native plants, ensuring a plentiful food supply, encouraging biodiversity and helping maintain a healthier ecological environment – – – the so-called “balance of nature.” Come learn …

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Permanent link to this article: http://gulf.ifas.ufl.edu/newsletters/2016/10/07/gardening-for-pollinator-conservation-workshop-october-13th-quincy-fl/

I’m so confused about seafood!

I’ve spent the past 25 years studying and growing fish. When folks find out I’m a fish head, I often get a lot of questions about the safety and sustainability of many seafood products.  It seems that the media and other groups have done a good job of scaring and confusing the American public to …

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Permanent link to this article: http://gulf.ifas.ufl.edu/newsletters/2016/10/07/im-so-confused-about-seafood/

Battling Bat Myths

This close-up photo of a Seminole bat and her two pups exhibits their furry, mammalian traits. Photo credit: Carrie Stevenson, UF IFAS Extension As we enter Halloween season, one of the most popular images of this spooky time of year is that of a bat. The creepy tales of vampire bats and Dracula are enduring …

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Permanent link to this article: http://gulf.ifas.ufl.edu/newsletters/2016/10/07/battling-bat-myths-2/

Seafood… What’s in Peak Season for October?

It’s October and it feels great outside. Time to fire up the grill and enjoy football with your favorite local seafood.  So what’s in peak season this month?   Clams – cultured Cedar Key clams are always in season and can be purchased at some local markets. Oysters – they like the cooler months, there …

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Permanent link to this article: http://gulf.ifas.ufl.edu/newsletters/2016/10/07/seafood-whats-in-peak-season-for-october/

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