Tag Archive: Pasture

Controlling Prickly Pear after Pasture Establishment

Photo 1. Prickly Pear after cultivation and pasture establishment in Gadsden County. Credit: Shep Eubanks UF/IFAS Prickly Pear is one of those tenacious, tough to handle weeds that you hate to find growing in your pastures and hay fields.  It can be very difficult to control and eradicate.  This weed typically spreads and reproduces via …

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Permanent link to this article: http://gulf.ifas.ufl.edu/newsletters/2017/09/08/controlling-prickly-pear-after-pasture-establishment/

UGA Pasture Insect Alert

Bermudagrass Stem Maggot While doing plot work at the Sunbelt Ag Expo late this week, Dr. Lisa Baxter (a post-doc in our program hired to assist with our stem maggot research) and I observed bermudagrass stem maggot pressure in our bermudagrass stands there. Alicia, Coastal, Russell, Tifton 44, and common bermudagrass had all suffered more than 20% …

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Permanent link to this article: http://gulf.ifas.ufl.edu/newsletters/2017/07/04/uga-pasture-insect-alert/

Principles of Pasture Productivity Seminar Series

Everyone who has grazing livestock needs to understand the fundamental principles of forage production. Photo credit: Doug Mayo Making the grass grow is not as simple or easy as many of us would like it to be. Even so, it is essential to successful livestock operations. Anyone who has grazing livestock needs to understand the …

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Permanent link to this article: http://gulf.ifas.ufl.edu/newsletters/2015/05/09/principles-of-pasture-productivity-seminar-series/

Dogfennel: Ugly Pasture Weeds that Reduce Bahia Production

Dogfennel will decrease forage production. Photo credit: John Atkins Dogfennel is one of the most commonly occurring pasture weeds in Florida. University of Florida Weed Specialists, Brent. Sellers and Jay. Ferrel developed a publication specifically to address this troublesome pasture weed.  Dogfennel (Eupatorium capillifolium) is an aggressive native perennial found throughout much of the Southeast. …

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Permanent link to this article: http://gulf.ifas.ufl.edu/newsletters/2015/05/08/dogfennel-ugly-pasture-weeds-that-reduce-bahia-production/

Fireweed: a Pasture Weed that will Light You Up!

Fireweed (Urtica chamaedryoides) photo by Brent Sellers Fireweed is growing well in the Panhandle and I have had a couple of calls this week regarding this plant. This winter annual stinging nettle will definitely light you up! I remember the first time I ever encountered Fireweed (Urtica chamaedryoides) while working on fence adjacent to my dad’s …

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Permanent link to this article: http://gulf.ifas.ufl.edu/newsletters/2015/01/24/fireweed-a-pasture-weed-that-will-light-you-up/

Pasture Soil Fertility Essential to Prevent Broomsedge Infestations

Broomsedge bluestem goes by many common names; broom grass, broom sage, sage brush, etc. No matter the name it is a sign of poor soil fertility. Broomsedge bluestem, or Andropogon virginicus L. is quite conspicuous this time of year. Its tall stems are the most noticeable feature in many fields. While these tall stems blowing in …

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Permanent link to this article: http://gulf.ifas.ufl.edu/newsletters/2015/01/17/pasture-soil-fertility-essential-to-prevent-broomsedge-infestations/

Growing Pasture Under Shade a Challenging Mix

Establishing pasture under mixed hardwood shade such as this is a challenging situation. By Dr. Henry Grant, Gadsden County Extension Director. Recently, I received a telephone call from a client regarding establishing a permanent pasture of Argentine Bahia for livestock grazing.  In this situation, the client did not want to remove many trees from the …

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Permanent link to this article: http://gulf.ifas.ufl.edu/newsletters/2013/07/20/growing-pasture-under-shade-a-challenging-mix/

Get Fired Up About Your Pasture or Hayfield

Burning fields and pastures has many benefits. Burning hayfields or pastures can reduce insect and disease pressure the following summer. Timely late winter burns (late February, early March) can offer several benefits to a hay or livestock producer. Burning off thatch kills annual weed seeds and any insect eggs present in the dead grass. Reducing …

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Permanent link to this article: http://gulf.ifas.ufl.edu/newsletters/2013/04/06/get-fired-up-about-your-pasture-or-hayfield/

Coral ardisia – An Invasive, Potentially Toxic, Pasture and Woodland Weed

Infestation of coral ardisiaAnn Murray, University of Florida, Bugwood.org Coral ardisia (Ardisia crenata) is an invasive non-native plant, introduced into Florida in the early 1900’s for ornamental purposes.  It is now found growing in hardwood hammocks and other moist woodlands of both wild and grazing lands.  In addition to overtaking native vegetation, this plant is …

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Permanent link to this article: http://gulf.ifas.ufl.edu/newsletters/2012/08/17/coral-ardisia-an-invasive-potentially-toxic-pasture-and-woodland-weed/

“Why do I have centipede grass taking over my Bahia pasture?” and “What can I do about it?”

Jed Dillard Jefferson County Extension The short answers are “Because of your pasture management” and “Change your pasture management.” Here’s the slightly longer version. After Jefferson County native Ed Finlayson discovered Pensacola Bahia it became widely used in the Deep South because of its low maintenance requirements. However, there are limits to how much abuse …

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Permanent link to this article: http://gulf.ifas.ufl.edu/newsletters/2012/07/06/why-do-i-have-centipede-grass-taking-over-my-bahia-pasture-and-what-can-i-do-about-it/

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