Tag Archive: Pastures

Fall Herbicide Applications are Best for Blackberry Control in Pastures

Fall is the best time to apply herbicides for blackberry briar control. Credit: Brent Sellers Brent Sellers and Jay Ferrell, UF/IFAS Weed Extension Specialists There are numerous briar or Rubus species (blackberry and dewberry) in the Southeastern U.S., many of which are found in Florida. Blackberry is common in most Florida pastures and can be overlooked …

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Permanent link to this article: http://gulf.ifas.ufl.edu/newsletters/2017/09/22/fall-herbicide-applications-are-best-for-blackberry-control-in-pastures/

Integrating Perennial Peanut into Grass Pastures

Figure 3. Rhizoma peanut + bahiagrass pastures 10 years after establishment.  Photo Credit: Miguel Castillo Jose Dubeux, University of Florida/IFAS – North Florida Research and Education Center (NFREC) Rhizoma peanut (commonly known as perennial peanut) is a warm-season perennial legume well adapted to Florida. It has high digestibility (65-75%) and crude protein concentrations (15-20%), that …

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Permanent link to this article: http://gulf.ifas.ufl.edu/newsletters/2015/06/19/integrating-perennial-peanut-into-grass-pastures/

Bee Pastures Supplement Hive Nutrition and Enhance Honey Production

Bee Balm (purple flower) and Partridge Pea (yellow flower in background) are two of the many types of plants to consider planting in a Bee Pasture. Bee Pastures can help increase the abundance and health of honey bees and native pollinators. Photo by Judy Ludlow Introduction and Background I am willing to bet that a …

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Permanent link to this article: http://gulf.ifas.ufl.edu/newsletters/2015/04/11/bee-pastures-supplement-hive-nutrition-and-enhance-honey-production/

Managing Winter Pastures

Rye pasture in Santa Rosa County is not ready for grazing yet. Small grains need to at least 8-12 inches tall before grazing, and ryegrass at least 6-12 inches. Photo credit John Atkins Winter feeding of the cow herd accounts for 40 to 50% of the total variable cost for producing weaned calves. Because winter …

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Permanent link to this article: http://gulf.ifas.ufl.edu/newsletters/2014/11/22/managing-winter-pastures/

Fertilizer Basics for Pastures and Hay Fields

Pasture Fertilization Demonstration highlighting different sources. Soil fertility and plant nutrient management is an important part of agroecosystems. Agroecological approaches to soil fertility and nutrient management begin with soil testing. A soil test will tell you soil pH. Soil pH affects the availability of nutrients to the plant. Soil pH should be adjusted to the …

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Permanent link to this article: http://gulf.ifas.ufl.edu/newsletters/2014/11/15/fertilizer-basics-for-pastures-and-hay-fields/

Temporary Pastures Can Hide Ugly Surprises

Coffee weed in a loafing area adjacent to winter grazing. Nightshade and crotalaria are even more toxic. Photo credit: Jed Dillard Using row crop land for cool season grazing is one of the great opportunities for North Florida livestock operations. Early crops come out in time to allow seedbed preparation for planting, and late harvested …

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Permanent link to this article: http://gulf.ifas.ufl.edu/newsletters/2014/10/17/temporary-pastures-can-hide-ugly-surprises/

Scout Pastures for Toxic Perilla Mint this Fall

Perilla mint in a pasture in Jackson County. Photo credit: Doug Mayo Documented distribution of perilla mint in Florida. Source: Atlas of Florida Vascular Plants. Perilla mint (perilla frutescnes) aka Beefstakeplant is a toxic weed that typically grows in shady, to partially shaded areas, damp spots, woodland edges, and  fence-lines of pastures in the Southeast. …

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Permanent link to this article: http://gulf.ifas.ufl.edu/newsletters/2014/10/09/scout-pastures-for-toxic-perilla-mint-this-fall/

Weed Control in Winter Pastures

Wild radish, commonly referred to as wild mustard can become a serious weed problem in winter pastures. It is time to begin scouting fields so that herbicide applications can be made prior to flowering. Photo credit: Doug Mayo Dr. Jay Ferrell, UF/IFAS Extension Weed Specialist & Dr. Brent Sellers, UF/IFAS Extension Weed Specialist Many cattle …

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Permanent link to this article: http://gulf.ifas.ufl.edu/newsletters/2013/12/14/weed-control-in-winter-pastures/

Yellowing in Bahiagrass Pastures

Yellowing in bahiagrass hay field Yellowing in bahiagrass pastures may be caused by micro-nutrient deficiencies associated with a high pH ( greater than 7.0) or soil borne insects associated with a low pH (less than 5.0).  The target pH for bahiagrass pastures is 5.5 with an acceptable range of 5.0-6.5. A soil pH of less …

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Permanent link to this article: http://gulf.ifas.ufl.edu/newsletters/2013/10/04/yellowing-in-bahiagrass-pastures/

Mosquitos Swarming Pastures After Heavy Rains

Standing water in pastures herald the beginning of mosquito season for livestock. Weeks of consistent above normal rains have filled farm ponds, ditches, swamps and anything else which will hold water.  While this is a positive trend for the water table and minimized, if not eliminates, the need for irrigation, there is a down side. …

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Permanent link to this article: http://gulf.ifas.ufl.edu/newsletters/2013/08/10/mosquitos-swarming-pastures-after-heavy-rains/

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